It’s Just Stuff – February 2017

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Needles and shuttles fixture

Dear Connie Sue,

My husband bought this old needles and shuttles fixture from an owner of a dry goods store. Can you tell me if it has any value — except great memories?

Rose Ann

Needles and shuttles fixture

Dear Rose Ann,

Although the trend to collect everything “country” and strive to recreate a dry goods store in your basement has faded, intact store displays with product still included are treasured nostalgic items.

Made around 1910 to display and sell Boyle Sewing Machine Needles and Shuttles, the fixture with stock drawer below is offered online for $400. A display with only the round metal top, without the drawer of items, sold in October for $300. The wooden tubes of various-sized needles and shuttles sell for $3 each.

Dishes

Dear Connie Sue,

Could you please tell me if these dishes, which came as a premium in oatmeal, are collectible? I have seen them priced in various places from less than a dollar up to $35 each. I have several of them and enjoy using them regularly.

Elaine

Dear Elaine,

Named the Star of David pattern, Anchor Hocking Glass made the pieces you have. In addition to oatmeal companies, gas stations, theaters and grocers also participated in giveaways and premiums for customers’ patronage with pressed-glass items.

I agree: This glass is serviceable and handy. Through the years, I’ve seen little pieces tucked in every room of people ’s homes… for grandkids’ snacks, as a scoop for cat food or to keep small items in place.

The pattern also came in serving and hostess items. A punch bowl with ladle and cups are currently priced around $40. Smaller oatmeal pieces sell from less than a dollar to $2. Those colored deep green and light blue bring slightly more.

Glass companies used the marks PRESCUT and NU-CUT on various patterns. They actually signify that the pieces are NOT cut glass but politely pretending to be such.

Dear Connie Sue,

This piece (pitcher) has been from pillar to post in my family for many years, and I use it to hold postage stamps. Underneath it reads “Meridian & Company 1893.”

Molle, Banner Elk, North Carolina

Dear Molle,

Your Meridian and Co. footed syrup pitcher with finial was ingeniously made to stop the flow of syrup with a hinged flap on the lip of the pitcher. Originally plated with silver, repeated use around pillars and posts has rubbed the shiny off. It is now stylish to use Victorian white metal items in their “unshiny” state, which eliminates the need to polish. Value as is: $9 to $20.

Dear Connie Sue,

This was in a yard sale bulk buy. I have not been able to locate any info on “Patsy Girl,” though I have found other items on the Nashville Company website. Do you have any info on this or have any suggestions where I might look?

Janet

Dear Janet,

Cloth panels imprinted with dolls were made to cut, sew together and stuff to form soft toys. They sell for $10 to $35 per panel.

Werthan Bag made and imprinted cloth and, later, paper bags for feed and flour producers. Founded in the late 1900s, it changed its name in 1928 to Werthan Bag Corp. I think your doll may have been a giveaway for an exhibit or reception in the mid to late 1900s. You might visit or call the Tennessee State Museum or Metro Nashville Archives for more information about Werthan Bag. Its impact on Nashville is ongoing.

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About Author

Connie Sue Davenport

Connie Sue Davenport, ISA AM, offers antique appraisal events, private appraisals and estate sale consulting services to individuals, businesses and organizations. Sign up for “IT’S JUST STUFF,” her FREE quarterly newsletter, at www.ConnieSue.com. Send your inquiry with photos to the mailing address or email below. Only published appraisals are free. Private appraisals are available for a fee. Call 615-672-1992 for an appointment. No appraisals are given over the phone. Connie Sue Davenport, P.O. Box 343, White House, TN 37188 615-672-1992 • email: Treasures@ConnieSue.com

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