Monday, August 3

It's Just Stuff

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egg-002This egg was given to me by my grandmother. She said she used it when darning holes in socks/stockings. It seems to be made of porcelain or white glass. I’ve never seen one in an antique store, but perhaps that is because it is fragile and not too many survived. It’s priceless to me, but I was curious as to its value.

Norma

Norma,

Your blown milk glass darning egg was made in the late 1800s. It might sell for around $12. In a decorator shop of shabby chic, in a bowl with other eggs, it might bring $35. Although functional, many eggs were decorated with sentimental thoughts and images, as was the way in Victorian times. Your grandmother’s hands erased this from your egg. Ostrich-sized eggs, never intended to be used for darning, often have embellishments intact.

sofaWe have two of these sofas — one that’s in the family and not for sale and this one that we just bought. It appears to be all original. I can’t find much on the Internet and was curious as to what I have and what it’s worth.

Thank you.
Missy

Missy,

Fresh-smelling, solid sofas like the one pictured can sell for around $1,500. You may have relieved an anxious seller, though, for far less than that. Made in the 1920s and 1930s, these sofas were a comfy compilation of previous styles. The eagle on the wooden crest is a Federal motif. The splay legs and rolled arms show an Empire influence. Manufacturers made top-of-the-line sofas and also produced economy models by cutting corners in workmanship and materials.

chestGood morning, Ms. Davenport,

My parents read your article in The Tennessee Magazine, and they were hoping you could review the mirror and chest. The mirror on the chest actually attaches to the unit, but because we have it stored in our attic, we don’t currently have it assembled.
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Holly

Dear Holly and parents,

Your parents’ side-by-side oak dresser is worth just less than $500. It appears to have been refinished, which is OK — no value lost. It was made just after 1900 and may have been ordered through a catalog, then picked up at the railroad depot. You might look underneath to make sure, but I think it had casters (little wheels) — replacing them with porcelain would be a nice touch. Side-by-sides with elaborate decoration sell quickly and can bring near $1,000.

chairDear Connie Sue,

I’m sending you these pictures so that maybe you can tell me something about this chair. My mother-in-law cleaned out an old shed and found it inside. It looked old and still worked so she held on to it. I don’t know if this would help, but the shed is located in Hancock County.

Also, we wanted you to know we read your article all the time. We love it!

Sincerely,
Patricia, Kyles Ford

Dear Patricia,

The chair is from an early 1900s school and was bolted to the floor. There was a corresponding desk that was also bolted down. They soon learned this would not keep the children still but carried on, nonetheless. The letters on the front of the seat were made by a child. If it were restored and ready to be bolted into its forever home, the value wouldn’t exceed $40. Thank you for writing and for reading my column.

Want to learn more about your antiques?

Send your inquiry with photos to the mailing address or email below. Only published appraisals are free. Private appraisals are available for a fee. Call 615-672-1992 for an appointment. No appraisals are given over the phone.

Connie Sue Davenport, P.O. Box 343
White House, TN 37188
615-672-1992 | email: Treasures@ConnieSue.com

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About Author

Connie Sue Davenport

Connie Sue Davenport, ISA AM, offers antique appraisal events, private appraisals and estate sale consulting services to individuals, businesses and organizations. Sign up for “IT’S JUST STUFF,” her FREE quarterly newsletter, at www.ConnieSue.com. Send your inquiry with photos to the mailing address or email below. Only published appraisals are free. Private appraisals are available for a fee. Call 615-672-1992 for an appointment. No appraisals are given over the phone. Connie Sue Davenport, P.O. Box 343, White House, TN 37188 615-672-1992 • email: Treasures@ConnieSue.com

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